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A Shs2000 tour of the Nile and Uganda’s historic monuments

This is a serialized write-up of all the major features of the Ugandan currencies. We are looking to see what the touristic features on the notes are and telling that story to the core of each notes. Journeying with you to all these places displayed on the notes.

Hope you caught our first story and then went on to our second story before you did this?

 By View Uganda

Standing tall for all to see in this boisterously blue note is the patriotic monument, fondly called the Independence Monument. It is the most visible monument on the note is the Independence statue, as featured on the extreme left of its back. Found along Speke Road, the monument measures six metres high and commemorates the state of self-leadership Uganda attained from Britain on 9th October 1962.

Built by Gregory Magoba, a professional sculptor from Kenya who at the time was teaching at Makerere University, the monument is fascinating. The statue depicts a man unwrapping himself and raising his child to touch the sky. It remains symbolic of the birth of a new nation free from colonialism and oppression, a story of Uganda’s independence.

First is the flora and fauna and then the historical monument. But all that doesn’t stand out quite as effortlessly as the pride country, the source of the Nile! See, world over, blue is representative of inviting or unique water bodies. Similarly, the 2000 note is dedicated to showcasing one of the world’s wonders, the Source of the Nile. On the back face of this sleek note is a statue erected in memory of John Speke’s historic discovery this attraction in 1858. It is a chapel-like monument that stands at the vantage point from which Speke stood—as he marveled at the powerfulness with which water was jetting off the riverbed to start its journey to the Mediterranean ocean.

The monument has a concrete triangular roof with tips pointing in the directions of settings that influenced the ‘discovery’ by Speke. One points towards the Mediterranean Sea, which is the river’s final destination. The other points towards its source in Jinja and the third, towards Buganda, a Kingdom that immensely supported Speke's pursuit/discovery.  It easily comes across as one of the most important historical attractions in Uganda.

Sadly, the rapids at this spot where submerged following the construction of Owen falls dam few kilometers downstream of river’s source. This was in 1954. However, one can still feel the might with which it gets off the ground. To get to it, you can take a five minutes boat ride from the river’s banks. It costs between ugx30, 000-150,000($10-$50) per person depending the tourism season. 

 The source of the Nile

It is not news anymore that the Nile is the world's longest river, yeah. True, stretching over 6,853 km or 4,258 miles long, this makes Uganda a must visit destination internationally. Even better, the Nile, a river that covers eleven countries is surely a treasure. These include Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, Burundi, Ethiopia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burundi, South Sudan, Eritrea, Sudan and Egypt. It is the primary water source of Egypt and Sudan, both of which are desert countries.

 

Fantastic offers at Brovad sands lodge , Samuka Island Jinja , Simba safaris in Queen Elizabeth.

 

 

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